Low Tone Baby Bottle Feeder Design

Mothers who have children with Down syndrome usually have trouble bottle feeding their baby. Children with Down syndrome oftentimes have low muscle tone in their face and therefore cannot apply suction to a bottle to feed. Mothers must use their thumb, forefinger, and sometimes their middle finger to adjust the baby’s jaw so the correct suction can be applied so they can feed. Holding the child and the child’s face makes it difficult to hold the bottle and feed the baby.

The students came up with some design solutions. The first is the Velcro with C-bracket Prototype. The Velcro is used to attach the C-bracket to glove worn on hand. The C-bracket holds the bottle in place, and the Velcro attached to the hand provides stability and some range of motion. The next solution uses foam with a Velcro strap. The foam is cut for the bottle to fit in and the foam straps to wrist with Velcro strap. The students also came up with the Hand cuff with pivot-head design. Cuff goes over hand and the pivot allows positioning of bottle while the C-bracket has good grip on bottle. The last design option is the Pistol Grip with Pivot-Head Prototype. This design incorporates a custom grip while still allowing pivot adjustable positioning of the bottle.

Designers/Engineers: Katie Bell, Randy Han, Kimberly Holland, and Taylor Wells

Example of the Pistol grip with pivot head using thumb to hold bottle up right. Another example of the Pistol grip with pivot head using thumb and forefinger to hold baby's mouth. The hand cuff with pivot-head design with fingers free to hold baby's mouth. The hand cuff with pivot-head design with hand open to demonstrate how the cuff stays automatically.

For more information on this project, contact Summer Ienuso at ccn@coa.gatech.edu